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We take a look at some of the history and key features of the stunning Stourbridge, Monart and Whitefriars pieces now available only at the Ceraudo Glass Boutique (on the Ceraudo gift store.)

The Romans may be responsible for introducing the skill of glass-making to Britain, but it was only during the Victorian era, when French and Venetian craftsmen made their way to the British Isles, that the industry really flourished. Fast-forward a few centuries and we’re left with a plethora of stunning and unique designs that effortlessly add panache to any room, whether used ornamentally or as decorative serving vessels.

Stourbridge Candy Stripe Frilled Rim Posy Vase

Stourbridge Candy Stripe Frilled Rim Posy Vase

Stourbridge Glass

The story of Stourbridge Glass begins in the 16th century, between the areas of Stourbridge, in the south, and Dudley, in the north. French craftsmen travelled from Lorraine to make use of the area’s copious natural resources, like clay and coal, in their glassmaking. Over the years, as needs and tastes changed, so too did the styles of the glass objects. By the beginning of the 19th century, glassmakers like Thomas Webb had firmly cemented what would become the distinctive Stourbridge style; vibrant colours, contrasting inner and outer casing and intricate frills are all key characteristics.

Shop our collection of Stourbridge glassware now to bring some gleaming Victorian charm to your home.

Whitefriars Jug and 6 Glasses

Whitefriars Jug and 6 Glasses

Whitefriars Glass

Whitefriars Glass is born from the Whitefriars area of London, where James Powell first opened his glass factory in the mid-19thcentury. The factory, run by Powell’s three sons from 1840 onwards, originally dealt in industrial glassware and stained glass – but as the company developed and the desire for ornamental glassware grew, Whitefriars Glass established its own unique style still adored by collectors, decorators and art enthusiasts alike.

Tell-tale signs of the Powells’ handiworks? Mottled, highly textured surfaces, geometric forms, and beguiling, deep jewel tones. Take a look on our gift store and find your dream piece in time for Christmas.

Large Cloudy Pink vase

Large Cloudy Pink vase

Monart Glass

With its symmetrical forms and jewel colours, Monart Glass is often mistaken for Whitefriars works – but its smooth surfaces, bubbly inclusions and roots in 1920s Scotland set it apart. Monart Glass had a serendipitous beginning, when Spanish glassblower Salvador Ysart created a prototype by accident John Moncrieff’s glass factory in Perth. Fortunately, Moncrieff’s wife, Isobel, loved the piece, and so Monart Glass (using “Mon-” from Moncreiff and “-art” from Ysart) came to life.

Flower vases, tableware, and even lamps in the duo’s distinctively porous and richly coloured style remain popular today – some even await you on the Ceraudo gift boutique.