A sneak peak inside the beautifully quirky Notting Hill home designed by an English actor and his film producer wife, shows how personal taste, improvisation and collecting can create your own individual haven.

The strikingly lit house covers four floors with large frameless skylights opening up the lower ground level. Simple backdrops of polished concrete floors and white timber are stylishly juxtaposed by an eclectic mix of objets d’art.

Lower ground open plan kitchen and dining area

Lower ground open plan kitchen and dining area

Stainless steel kitchen island is softened with country style cabinets and colourful earthenware

Stainless steel kitchen island and range are softened with country style cabinets, Carrara marble and colourful earthenware

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Kitchen dresser surrounded by artworks. The bottom right artwork, by one of their sons, has been placed on an old canvas stand for the past 10 years “collecting dust!”

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Mid-century red leather chairs provide a hit of colour against the polished concrete

A large outline drawing of a busy kitchen restaurant was hung in the lower ground level kitchen space, which was commissioned by a local artist for a joint 50th birthday present to each other

A large outline drawing of a busy kitchen restaurant was hung in the lower ground level kitchen space, commissioned by a local artist as a joint 50th birthday present to each other

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Mid-century furniture, painted antique dresser and life drawings create a complementary mix of styles for the lower ground living area.

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Blue upholstered mid-century cocktail chairs are contrasted with soft red velvet cushions.

Colourful Mexican style painted kitchen chairs framed by a beautiful striped orange Kilim rug

Colourful Mexican style painted kitchen chairs framed by a beautiful striped orange Kilim rug

The couple bought the house (situated just off Portobello Rd) in 1992 – back when the whole of Notting Hill felt like Golbourne Road does today.

They don’t stick to any kind of inspiration or sources, but instead maintain a constantly evolving collection of decorative pieces.

Their budget is £5 for items to restore or manipulate, examples of which can be seen on every one of the four floors – proving the Ceraudo mantra that a great interior needn’t cost the earth.

One of their sons' potato painting framed with a traditional intricate gilded frame

One of their sons’ potato paintings framed with a traditional intricate gilded frame

Drawing room situated at the front of the house, filled with antiques and objets d'art

Drawing room situated at the front of the house, filled with antiques and objets d’art

They generally find Christie‘s a good source of inspiration, particularly the ‘Gentleman’s Library Sale’ for its focus on pieces from explored lands and adventures.

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Beautifully worn tan leather club chair

Beautifully worn tan leather club chair

An old leather bicycle seat bought from a local shop has been converted into an indigenous looking mask.

An old leather bicycle seat bought from a local shop has been converted into an indigenous looking mask.

Library filled with beautiful light from the french doors

Library filled with beautiful light from the French doors

This sense of adventure, travel and religion is prominent throughout the house with numerous skulls and kitsch Catholic figurines.

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A salvaged figurine

A second hand purchase - medicine cabinet which they filled with religious figures

A second hand purchase – medicine cabinet which they then filled with religious figures

The lady of the house doesn’t quite share her husband’s decorative eclecticism. The volume of pieces inside (sometimes referred to by her as “junk”!) means that new additions are rarely spotted instantly. That said, the fact that she instantly knows something has been added to a room, even if it hasn’t yet been discovered, surely shows that the interior melange has more than an accidental sense of purpose.

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This hand-embroidered wall tapestry hangs behind the bed in the master bedroom. The tapestry was originally framed when they found it on holiday so they removed the frame and rolled it up to bring home in their suitcase.

This hand-embroidered wall tapestry hangs behind the bed in the master bedroom. The tapestry was originally framed when found on holiday, so they removed the frame and rolled it up to bring home in their suitcase.

Top tips:

“De-clutter when you can; if you have a garden, make use of it whenever you can (the garden here is used all summer long); keep original features if possible.”

“Improvisation is key.”